“Life is difficult; don’t be lazy” – 2 great lessons from M. Scott Peck’s The Road Less Traveled, maybe the best book I have ever read


Yesterday, Bob Morris and I both weighed in on this blog with our “best business books” list from 2009.  (Our lists were very different – mine here, Bob’s here).  So I started thinking about which books I have read that have had true, lasting impact on my thinking, and even occasionally my behavior.  I keep thinking back to one book.  I read it in the 1980’s, and though I do not live up to its teachings, I certainly remember them —  frequently.  I might even call it the best book I have ever read, because it gives me such profound life lessons.

The book is The Road Less Traveled: A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth by M. Scott Peck.  (You can purchase the 25th anniversary edition at Amazon here).  My well-read and fully-marked-up copy is in storage, but thanks to Amazon’s preview feature, I here include the greatest first page of a non-fiction book that I have ever read:

Life is difficult.
This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths.  It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it.  Once we truly know that life is difficult – once we truly understand and accept it – then life is no longer difficult.  Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters.
Most do not fully see that truth that life is difficult.  Instead they moan more or less incessantly, noisily or subtly, about the enormity of their problems, their burdens, and their difficulties as if life were generally easy, as if life should be easy.  They voice their belief, noisily or subtly, that their difficulties represent a unique kind of affliction that should not be and that has somehow been especially visited upon them, or else upon their families, their tribe, their class, their nation, their race or even their species, and not upon others.  I know about this moaning because I have done my share.
Life is a series of problems.  Do we want to moan about them or solve them?  Do we want to teach our children to solve them?
Discipline is the basic set of tools to solve life’s problems.  Without discipline we can solve nothing.

From this book, I remember two great truths:

1)  Life is difficult. When you accept this truth, then you can “expect” the next difficulty to arrive, and tackle it as it should be tackled – as the next difficulty on your list of difficulties.  There is no life without difficulties!  This is truly a great truth.  (And, yes, very Buddhist – although you can find plenty of confirmation in Christian Scripture).

2).  You (and all of us) are lazy – seek to overcome your laziness! In the book, Peck does not define laziness as doing nothing (couch potato laziness), but rather, laziness is spending time on the “wrong thing.”  And the “right thing” is always beckoned by love.  Here is the principle:  Even if we work diligently on work that needs to be done at some point, if it is not the thing you should be working on at this moment, it is laziness.  Avoiding the challenge that we most need to tackle is laziness.
Peck defines laziness as a failure to love.  Here is a quote (lifted from a quotes page from the web; as I said, my copy is in storage): evil is laziness carried to its ultimate, extraordinary extreme. As I have defined it, love is the antithesis of laziness. Ordinary laziness is a passive failure to love.

So, as we think about the best books we have read in the last year, maybe it is time to revisit books that most shaped us – and to remember their valuable lessons.  And if you have never read The Road Less Traveled, let me encourage you to do so.  I believe it is worth the investment of time.

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2 thoughts on ““Life is difficult; don’t be lazy” – 2 great lessons from M. Scott Peck’s The Road Less Traveled, maybe the best book I have ever read

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